dezeen:

New York office with a 330-metre-long desk that wraps around corridors »

Exhibition Design Inspiration
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dezeen:

New York office with a 330-metre-long desk that wraps around corridors »

Exhibition Design Inspiration
ZoomInfo
dezeen:

New York office with a 330-metre-long desk that wraps around corridors »

Exhibition Design Inspiration
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"Immersion: reality* set to produce enhanced, intensified experience."

Herman Kossman, Narrative Spaces: On the Art of Exhibiting, p.86. The text below is loosely quoted from the same source:

In the context of exhibition design, the challenge is to immerse the visitor in a narrative that does allow some room for individual imagination!

Why? Because the visitor still needs to be able to relate to the narrative/exhibition, relate in the way that they can become part of it, without losing their own identity. It all comes down to credibility! In other words, immersion with critical distance.

This is the type of immersion that actually touches the visitor. It makes the visitor “look again” at what is presented, it makes him leave the exhibit as a different person, changed!

This is where immersion is notably at play, because it doesn’t require the reality of the place to be completely detached from everyday life, but it does demand a fair amount of deviation. This is crucial for the narrative of the poetry of the place to touch people. As such, exhibitions need to be places of singular, memorable identity. Like books or cinema, they establish environments for a story. In books and cinema, the environment is a virtual one; in exhibitions it is real.

*alternative artificial reality, which is by no means unreal.

(via museograph)

Immersion in consort with individual imagination.

Wonderful post by @museograph! Pay attention, #MAEXCORCORAN students!

Design Matters With Debbie Millman: Tom Geismar

explore-blog:

It’s not what you like, it’s what works… Great clients – there aren’t that many that you have over your career, but the ones that you think are great generally are open to other ideas and not [attached to] preconceived ideas.

The new season of Debbie Millman’s excellent Design Mattersthe world’s first radio show about design, currently in its 10th year – kicks off with this spectacular interview with design icon Tom Geismar, winner of the 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award by the Cooper Hewitt National Design Awards. 

For a further taste of the exceptional Design Matters, see Millman’s conversations with Chris Ware, Dani Shapiro, Seth Godin, Terry Teachout, Sophie Blackall, and Massimo Vignelli, then subscribe on iTunes – it’s free and well worth it.

#designmatters

Source: SoundCloud / Design Matters

6design matters,

Projection Mapping: Exhibition Technique #MAEXcorcoran
artandsciencejournal:

‘Little Boxes’ projection mapping by Alinta Krauth
 
While projection mapping is sometimes a generic spectacle, there are artists who transcend the genre. Alinta Krauth’s work Little Boxes, a combination of projection mapping and visual art, is a hypnotizing world of exploding color and light, where animation beams from origami sculpture as if by magic, and kaleidoscopic patterns shift between shapes as if on little origami television screens.  She has transformed the use of a projector and software to become truly a fine art. 
 
But what is her artwork about, what theme is she attempting to address with her magic? Well, climate change is upon us. This planet has lost 50% of its wildlife in the last 40 years. Old-growth forests have been devastated. Keystone animal species have been chased out of their homes to the detriment of the earth itself. 
 
Another keystone creature greatly affected by humans and climate change is the bat. The flying fox or ‘megabat’, in particular, is a misunderstood nocturnal pollinator that helps spawn rainforests and keeps our crops alive. But in our minds it sits on the borderline between mystical and cute, beautiful and scary. In gothic literature, and still today, the flying fox is a creature of darkness that has inspired some of the world’s bestselling novels and movies. While they are internationally loved, and ecologically important, some humans who reside near them have a different view, particularly in light of recent global panic and media hype surrounding the Ebola virus. This juxtaposition is made worse differing levels of education on flying foxes and viruses. The flying fox has moved further south across the world, and further into suburbs due to climate change and habitat destruction, and thus this creature represents a key issue of sustainability, global warming, and human/animal disruption.
 
And Alinta’s creation Little Boxes, confronts this issue, and proposes the flying fox as a creature of light, rather than darkness. Little Boxes brings together the worlds of projection mapping, conceptual glitch art, origami, and education of ecological sustainability, by projecting glitched data, film, and animation onto origami-inspired sculptures of flying foxes and abstract trees. Her work calls upon the viewer to rethink their notions of the wildlife/human relationship without media hype. And as the viewer moves around these creations, they learn to consider themselves as part of nocturnal structure. 
 
To Krauth, it is important to use art and entertainment to bring scientific education to a wider audience. Her kaleidoscopic world ties together ecology and glitch art through the concept of disruption. An environmental disruption exists between us, whereby we disrupt their habitat and in turn some believe that they are disrupting ours. Glitch art is a digital data disruption, and an assault on the senses, that finds the beautiful and poetic in disorder and disarrangement. Although you can’t tell from these pictures, the piece is also aided by music. The music of this piece was created by “taking maps of local rivers and using their shapes to create musical notation” says Alinta. 
  
And in the end, we reach a rare nirvana, the space between technical prowess, true ingenuity, artistic wonderment, wrapped in a most urgent call for us to rethink our relationships with the creations around us.
 
See a video here.
 
By guest reviewer Jason Nelson.
ZoomInfo
Projection Mapping: Exhibition Technique #MAEXcorcoran
artandsciencejournal:

‘Little Boxes’ projection mapping by Alinta Krauth
 
While projection mapping is sometimes a generic spectacle, there are artists who transcend the genre. Alinta Krauth’s work Little Boxes, a combination of projection mapping and visual art, is a hypnotizing world of exploding color and light, where animation beams from origami sculpture as if by magic, and kaleidoscopic patterns shift between shapes as if on little origami television screens.  She has transformed the use of a projector and software to become truly a fine art. 
 
But what is her artwork about, what theme is she attempting to address with her magic? Well, climate change is upon us. This planet has lost 50% of its wildlife in the last 40 years. Old-growth forests have been devastated. Keystone animal species have been chased out of their homes to the detriment of the earth itself. 
 
Another keystone creature greatly affected by humans and climate change is the bat. The flying fox or ‘megabat’, in particular, is a misunderstood nocturnal pollinator that helps spawn rainforests and keeps our crops alive. But in our minds it sits on the borderline between mystical and cute, beautiful and scary. In gothic literature, and still today, the flying fox is a creature of darkness that has inspired some of the world’s bestselling novels and movies. While they are internationally loved, and ecologically important, some humans who reside near them have a different view, particularly in light of recent global panic and media hype surrounding the Ebola virus. This juxtaposition is made worse differing levels of education on flying foxes and viruses. The flying fox has moved further south across the world, and further into suburbs due to climate change and habitat destruction, and thus this creature represents a key issue of sustainability, global warming, and human/animal disruption.
 
And Alinta’s creation Little Boxes, confronts this issue, and proposes the flying fox as a creature of light, rather than darkness. Little Boxes brings together the worlds of projection mapping, conceptual glitch art, origami, and education of ecological sustainability, by projecting glitched data, film, and animation onto origami-inspired sculptures of flying foxes and abstract trees. Her work calls upon the viewer to rethink their notions of the wildlife/human relationship without media hype. And as the viewer moves around these creations, they learn to consider themselves as part of nocturnal structure. 
 
To Krauth, it is important to use art and entertainment to bring scientific education to a wider audience. Her kaleidoscopic world ties together ecology and glitch art through the concept of disruption. An environmental disruption exists between us, whereby we disrupt their habitat and in turn some believe that they are disrupting ours. Glitch art is a digital data disruption, and an assault on the senses, that finds the beautiful and poetic in disorder and disarrangement. Although you can’t tell from these pictures, the piece is also aided by music. The music of this piece was created by “taking maps of local rivers and using their shapes to create musical notation” says Alinta. 
  
And in the end, we reach a rare nirvana, the space between technical prowess, true ingenuity, artistic wonderment, wrapped in a most urgent call for us to rethink our relationships with the creations around us.
 
See a video here.
 
By guest reviewer Jason Nelson.
ZoomInfo
Projection Mapping: Exhibition Technique #MAEXcorcoran
artandsciencejournal:

‘Little Boxes’ projection mapping by Alinta Krauth
 
While projection mapping is sometimes a generic spectacle, there are artists who transcend the genre. Alinta Krauth’s work Little Boxes, a combination of projection mapping and visual art, is a hypnotizing world of exploding color and light, where animation beams from origami sculpture as if by magic, and kaleidoscopic patterns shift between shapes as if on little origami television screens.  She has transformed the use of a projector and software to become truly a fine art. 
 
But what is her artwork about, what theme is she attempting to address with her magic? Well, climate change is upon us. This planet has lost 50% of its wildlife in the last 40 years. Old-growth forests have been devastated. Keystone animal species have been chased out of their homes to the detriment of the earth itself. 
 
Another keystone creature greatly affected by humans and climate change is the bat. The flying fox or ‘megabat’, in particular, is a misunderstood nocturnal pollinator that helps spawn rainforests and keeps our crops alive. But in our minds it sits on the borderline between mystical and cute, beautiful and scary. In gothic literature, and still today, the flying fox is a creature of darkness that has inspired some of the world’s bestselling novels and movies. While they are internationally loved, and ecologically important, some humans who reside near them have a different view, particularly in light of recent global panic and media hype surrounding the Ebola virus. This juxtaposition is made worse differing levels of education on flying foxes and viruses. The flying fox has moved further south across the world, and further into suburbs due to climate change and habitat destruction, and thus this creature represents a key issue of sustainability, global warming, and human/animal disruption.
 
And Alinta’s creation Little Boxes, confronts this issue, and proposes the flying fox as a creature of light, rather than darkness. Little Boxes brings together the worlds of projection mapping, conceptual glitch art, origami, and education of ecological sustainability, by projecting glitched data, film, and animation onto origami-inspired sculptures of flying foxes and abstract trees. Her work calls upon the viewer to rethink their notions of the wildlife/human relationship without media hype. And as the viewer moves around these creations, they learn to consider themselves as part of nocturnal structure. 
 
To Krauth, it is important to use art and entertainment to bring scientific education to a wider audience. Her kaleidoscopic world ties together ecology and glitch art through the concept of disruption. An environmental disruption exists between us, whereby we disrupt their habitat and in turn some believe that they are disrupting ours. Glitch art is a digital data disruption, and an assault on the senses, that finds the beautiful and poetic in disorder and disarrangement. Although you can’t tell from these pictures, the piece is also aided by music. The music of this piece was created by “taking maps of local rivers and using their shapes to create musical notation” says Alinta. 
  
And in the end, we reach a rare nirvana, the space between technical prowess, true ingenuity, artistic wonderment, wrapped in a most urgent call for us to rethink our relationships with the creations around us.
 
See a video here.
 
By guest reviewer Jason Nelson.
ZoomInfo
Projection Mapping: Exhibition Technique #MAEXcorcoran
artandsciencejournal:

‘Little Boxes’ projection mapping by Alinta Krauth
 
While projection mapping is sometimes a generic spectacle, there are artists who transcend the genre. Alinta Krauth’s work Little Boxes, a combination of projection mapping and visual art, is a hypnotizing world of exploding color and light, where animation beams from origami sculpture as if by magic, and kaleidoscopic patterns shift between shapes as if on little origami television screens.  She has transformed the use of a projector and software to become truly a fine art. 
 
But what is her artwork about, what theme is she attempting to address with her magic? Well, climate change is upon us. This planet has lost 50% of its wildlife in the last 40 years. Old-growth forests have been devastated. Keystone animal species have been chased out of their homes to the detriment of the earth itself. 
 
Another keystone creature greatly affected by humans and climate change is the bat. The flying fox or ‘megabat’, in particular, is a misunderstood nocturnal pollinator that helps spawn rainforests and keeps our crops alive. But in our minds it sits on the borderline between mystical and cute, beautiful and scary. In gothic literature, and still today, the flying fox is a creature of darkness that has inspired some of the world’s bestselling novels and movies. While they are internationally loved, and ecologically important, some humans who reside near them have a different view, particularly in light of recent global panic and media hype surrounding the Ebola virus. This juxtaposition is made worse differing levels of education on flying foxes and viruses. The flying fox has moved further south across the world, and further into suburbs due to climate change and habitat destruction, and thus this creature represents a key issue of sustainability, global warming, and human/animal disruption.
 
And Alinta’s creation Little Boxes, confronts this issue, and proposes the flying fox as a creature of light, rather than darkness. Little Boxes brings together the worlds of projection mapping, conceptual glitch art, origami, and education of ecological sustainability, by projecting glitched data, film, and animation onto origami-inspired sculptures of flying foxes and abstract trees. Her work calls upon the viewer to rethink their notions of the wildlife/human relationship without media hype. And as the viewer moves around these creations, they learn to consider themselves as part of nocturnal structure. 
 
To Krauth, it is important to use art and entertainment to bring scientific education to a wider audience. Her kaleidoscopic world ties together ecology and glitch art through the concept of disruption. An environmental disruption exists between us, whereby we disrupt their habitat and in turn some believe that they are disrupting ours. Glitch art is a digital data disruption, and an assault on the senses, that finds the beautiful and poetic in disorder and disarrangement. Although you can’t tell from these pictures, the piece is also aided by music. The music of this piece was created by “taking maps of local rivers and using their shapes to create musical notation” says Alinta. 
  
And in the end, we reach a rare nirvana, the space between technical prowess, true ingenuity, artistic wonderment, wrapped in a most urgent call for us to rethink our relationships with the creations around us.
 
See a video here.
 
By guest reviewer Jason Nelson.
ZoomInfo
Projection Mapping: Exhibition Technique #MAEXcorcoran
artandsciencejournal:

‘Little Boxes’ projection mapping by Alinta Krauth
 
While projection mapping is sometimes a generic spectacle, there are artists who transcend the genre. Alinta Krauth’s work Little Boxes, a combination of projection mapping and visual art, is a hypnotizing world of exploding color and light, where animation beams from origami sculpture as if by magic, and kaleidoscopic patterns shift between shapes as if on little origami television screens.  She has transformed the use of a projector and software to become truly a fine art. 
 
But what is her artwork about, what theme is she attempting to address with her magic? Well, climate change is upon us. This planet has lost 50% of its wildlife in the last 40 years. Old-growth forests have been devastated. Keystone animal species have been chased out of their homes to the detriment of the earth itself. 
 
Another keystone creature greatly affected by humans and climate change is the bat. The flying fox or ‘megabat’, in particular, is a misunderstood nocturnal pollinator that helps spawn rainforests and keeps our crops alive. But in our minds it sits on the borderline between mystical and cute, beautiful and scary. In gothic literature, and still today, the flying fox is a creature of darkness that has inspired some of the world’s bestselling novels and movies. While they are internationally loved, and ecologically important, some humans who reside near them have a different view, particularly in light of recent global panic and media hype surrounding the Ebola virus. This juxtaposition is made worse differing levels of education on flying foxes and viruses. The flying fox has moved further south across the world, and further into suburbs due to climate change and habitat destruction, and thus this creature represents a key issue of sustainability, global warming, and human/animal disruption.
 
And Alinta’s creation Little Boxes, confronts this issue, and proposes the flying fox as a creature of light, rather than darkness. Little Boxes brings together the worlds of projection mapping, conceptual glitch art, origami, and education of ecological sustainability, by projecting glitched data, film, and animation onto origami-inspired sculptures of flying foxes and abstract trees. Her work calls upon the viewer to rethink their notions of the wildlife/human relationship without media hype. And as the viewer moves around these creations, they learn to consider themselves as part of nocturnal structure. 
 
To Krauth, it is important to use art and entertainment to bring scientific education to a wider audience. Her kaleidoscopic world ties together ecology and glitch art through the concept of disruption. An environmental disruption exists between us, whereby we disrupt their habitat and in turn some believe that they are disrupting ours. Glitch art is a digital data disruption, and an assault on the senses, that finds the beautiful and poetic in disorder and disarrangement. Although you can’t tell from these pictures, the piece is also aided by music. The music of this piece was created by “taking maps of local rivers and using their shapes to create musical notation” says Alinta. 
  
And in the end, we reach a rare nirvana, the space between technical prowess, true ingenuity, artistic wonderment, wrapped in a most urgent call for us to rethink our relationships with the creations around us.
 
See a video here.
 
By guest reviewer Jason Nelson.
ZoomInfo
Projection Mapping: Exhibition Technique #MAEXcorcoran
artandsciencejournal:

‘Little Boxes’ projection mapping by Alinta Krauth
 
While projection mapping is sometimes a generic spectacle, there are artists who transcend the genre. Alinta Krauth’s work Little Boxes, a combination of projection mapping and visual art, is a hypnotizing world of exploding color and light, where animation beams from origami sculpture as if by magic, and kaleidoscopic patterns shift between shapes as if on little origami television screens.  She has transformed the use of a projector and software to become truly a fine art. 
 
But what is her artwork about, what theme is she attempting to address with her magic? Well, climate change is upon us. This planet has lost 50% of its wildlife in the last 40 years. Old-growth forests have been devastated. Keystone animal species have been chased out of their homes to the detriment of the earth itself. 
 
Another keystone creature greatly affected by humans and climate change is the bat. The flying fox or ‘megabat’, in particular, is a misunderstood nocturnal pollinator that helps spawn rainforests and keeps our crops alive. But in our minds it sits on the borderline between mystical and cute, beautiful and scary. In gothic literature, and still today, the flying fox is a creature of darkness that has inspired some of the world’s bestselling novels and movies. While they are internationally loved, and ecologically important, some humans who reside near them have a different view, particularly in light of recent global panic and media hype surrounding the Ebola virus. This juxtaposition is made worse differing levels of education on flying foxes and viruses. The flying fox has moved further south across the world, and further into suburbs due to climate change and habitat destruction, and thus this creature represents a key issue of sustainability, global warming, and human/animal disruption.
 
And Alinta’s creation Little Boxes, confronts this issue, and proposes the flying fox as a creature of light, rather than darkness. Little Boxes brings together the worlds of projection mapping, conceptual glitch art, origami, and education of ecological sustainability, by projecting glitched data, film, and animation onto origami-inspired sculptures of flying foxes and abstract trees. Her work calls upon the viewer to rethink their notions of the wildlife/human relationship without media hype. And as the viewer moves around these creations, they learn to consider themselves as part of nocturnal structure. 
 
To Krauth, it is important to use art and entertainment to bring scientific education to a wider audience. Her kaleidoscopic world ties together ecology and glitch art through the concept of disruption. An environmental disruption exists between us, whereby we disrupt their habitat and in turn some believe that they are disrupting ours. Glitch art is a digital data disruption, and an assault on the senses, that finds the beautiful and poetic in disorder and disarrangement. Although you can’t tell from these pictures, the piece is also aided by music. The music of this piece was created by “taking maps of local rivers and using their shapes to create musical notation” says Alinta. 
  
And in the end, we reach a rare nirvana, the space between technical prowess, true ingenuity, artistic wonderment, wrapped in a most urgent call for us to rethink our relationships with the creations around us.
 
See a video here.
 
By guest reviewer Jason Nelson.
ZoomInfo
Projection Mapping: Exhibition Technique #MAEXcorcoran
artandsciencejournal:

‘Little Boxes’ projection mapping by Alinta Krauth
 
While projection mapping is sometimes a generic spectacle, there are artists who transcend the genre. Alinta Krauth’s work Little Boxes, a combination of projection mapping and visual art, is a hypnotizing world of exploding color and light, where animation beams from origami sculpture as if by magic, and kaleidoscopic patterns shift between shapes as if on little origami television screens.  She has transformed the use of a projector and software to become truly a fine art. 
 
But what is her artwork about, what theme is she attempting to address with her magic? Well, climate change is upon us. This planet has lost 50% of its wildlife in the last 40 years. Old-growth forests have been devastated. Keystone animal species have been chased out of their homes to the detriment of the earth itself. 
 
Another keystone creature greatly affected by humans and climate change is the bat. The flying fox or ‘megabat’, in particular, is a misunderstood nocturnal pollinator that helps spawn rainforests and keeps our crops alive. But in our minds it sits on the borderline between mystical and cute, beautiful and scary. In gothic literature, and still today, the flying fox is a creature of darkness that has inspired some of the world’s bestselling novels and movies. While they are internationally loved, and ecologically important, some humans who reside near them have a different view, particularly in light of recent global panic and media hype surrounding the Ebola virus. This juxtaposition is made worse differing levels of education on flying foxes and viruses. The flying fox has moved further south across the world, and further into suburbs due to climate change and habitat destruction, and thus this creature represents a key issue of sustainability, global warming, and human/animal disruption.
 
And Alinta’s creation Little Boxes, confronts this issue, and proposes the flying fox as a creature of light, rather than darkness. Little Boxes brings together the worlds of projection mapping, conceptual glitch art, origami, and education of ecological sustainability, by projecting glitched data, film, and animation onto origami-inspired sculptures of flying foxes and abstract trees. Her work calls upon the viewer to rethink their notions of the wildlife/human relationship without media hype. And as the viewer moves around these creations, they learn to consider themselves as part of nocturnal structure. 
 
To Krauth, it is important to use art and entertainment to bring scientific education to a wider audience. Her kaleidoscopic world ties together ecology and glitch art through the concept of disruption. An environmental disruption exists between us, whereby we disrupt their habitat and in turn some believe that they are disrupting ours. Glitch art is a digital data disruption, and an assault on the senses, that finds the beautiful and poetic in disorder and disarrangement. Although you can’t tell from these pictures, the piece is also aided by music. The music of this piece was created by “taking maps of local rivers and using their shapes to create musical notation” says Alinta. 
  
And in the end, we reach a rare nirvana, the space between technical prowess, true ingenuity, artistic wonderment, wrapped in a most urgent call for us to rethink our relationships with the creations around us.
 
See a video here.
 
By guest reviewer Jason Nelson.
ZoomInfo
Projection Mapping: Exhibition Technique #MAEXcorcoran
artandsciencejournal:

‘Little Boxes’ projection mapping by Alinta Krauth
 
While projection mapping is sometimes a generic spectacle, there are artists who transcend the genre. Alinta Krauth’s work Little Boxes, a combination of projection mapping and visual art, is a hypnotizing world of exploding color and light, where animation beams from origami sculpture as if by magic, and kaleidoscopic patterns shift between shapes as if on little origami television screens.  She has transformed the use of a projector and software to become truly a fine art. 
 
But what is her artwork about, what theme is she attempting to address with her magic? Well, climate change is upon us. This planet has lost 50% of its wildlife in the last 40 years. Old-growth forests have been devastated. Keystone animal species have been chased out of their homes to the detriment of the earth itself. 
 
Another keystone creature greatly affected by humans and climate change is the bat. The flying fox or ‘megabat’, in particular, is a misunderstood nocturnal pollinator that helps spawn rainforests and keeps our crops alive. But in our minds it sits on the borderline between mystical and cute, beautiful and scary. In gothic literature, and still today, the flying fox is a creature of darkness that has inspired some of the world’s bestselling novels and movies. While they are internationally loved, and ecologically important, some humans who reside near them have a different view, particularly in light of recent global panic and media hype surrounding the Ebola virus. This juxtaposition is made worse differing levels of education on flying foxes and viruses. The flying fox has moved further south across the world, and further into suburbs due to climate change and habitat destruction, and thus this creature represents a key issue of sustainability, global warming, and human/animal disruption.
 
And Alinta’s creation Little Boxes, confronts this issue, and proposes the flying fox as a creature of light, rather than darkness. Little Boxes brings together the worlds of projection mapping, conceptual glitch art, origami, and education of ecological sustainability, by projecting glitched data, film, and animation onto origami-inspired sculptures of flying foxes and abstract trees. Her work calls upon the viewer to rethink their notions of the wildlife/human relationship without media hype. And as the viewer moves around these creations, they learn to consider themselves as part of nocturnal structure. 
 
To Krauth, it is important to use art and entertainment to bring scientific education to a wider audience. Her kaleidoscopic world ties together ecology and glitch art through the concept of disruption. An environmental disruption exists between us, whereby we disrupt their habitat and in turn some believe that they are disrupting ours. Glitch art is a digital data disruption, and an assault on the senses, that finds the beautiful and poetic in disorder and disarrangement. Although you can’t tell from these pictures, the piece is also aided by music. The music of this piece was created by “taking maps of local rivers and using their shapes to create musical notation” says Alinta. 
  
And in the end, we reach a rare nirvana, the space between technical prowess, true ingenuity, artistic wonderment, wrapped in a most urgent call for us to rethink our relationships with the creations around us.
 
See a video here.
 
By guest reviewer Jason Nelson.
ZoomInfo

Projection Mapping: Exhibition Technique #MAEXcorcoran

artandsciencejournal:

‘Little Boxes’ projection mapping by Alinta Krauth

 

While projection mapping is sometimes a generic spectacle, there are artists who transcend the genre. Alinta Krauth’s work Little Boxes, a combination of projection mapping and visual art, is a hypnotizing world of exploding color and light, where animation beams from origami sculpture as if by magic, and kaleidoscopic patterns shift between shapes as if on little origami television screens.  She has transformed the use of a projector and software to become truly a fine art.

 

But what is her artwork about, what theme is she attempting to address with her magic? Well, climate change is upon us. This planet has lost 50% of its wildlife in the last 40 years. Old-growth forests have been devastated. Keystone animal species have been chased out of their homes to the detriment of the earth itself.

 

Another keystone creature greatly affected by humans and climate change is the bat. The flying fox or ‘megabat’, in particular, is a misunderstood nocturnal pollinator that helps spawn rainforests and keeps our crops alive. But in our minds it sits on the borderline between mystical and cute, beautiful and scary. In gothic literature, and still today, the flying fox is a creature of darkness that has inspired some of the world’s bestselling novels and movies. While they are internationally loved, and ecologically important, some humans who reside near them have a different view, particularly in light of recent global panic and media hype surrounding the Ebola virus. This juxtaposition is made worse differing levels of education on flying foxes and viruses. The flying fox has moved further south across the world, and further into suburbs due to climate change and habitat destruction, and thus this creature represents a key issue of sustainability, global warming, and human/animal disruption.

 

And Alinta’s creation Little Boxes, confronts this issue, and proposes the flying fox as a creature of light, rather than darkness. Little Boxes brings together the worlds of projection mapping, conceptual glitch art, origami, and education of ecological sustainability, by projecting glitched data, film, and animation onto origami-inspired sculptures of flying foxes and abstract trees. Her work calls upon the viewer to rethink their notions of the wildlife/human relationship without media hype. And as the viewer moves around these creations, they learn to consider themselves as part of nocturnal structure.

 

To Krauth, it is important to use art and entertainment to bring scientific education to a wider audience. Her kaleidoscopic world ties together ecology and glitch art through the concept of disruption. An environmental disruption exists between us, whereby we disrupt their habitat and in turn some believe that they are disrupting ours. Glitch art is a digital data disruption, and an assault on the senses, that finds the beautiful and poetic in disorder and disarrangement. Although you can’t tell from these pictures, the piece is also aided by music. The music of this piece was created by “taking maps of local rivers and using their shapes to create musical notation” says Alinta.

  

And in the end, we reach a rare nirvana, the space between technical prowess, true ingenuity, artistic wonderment, wrapped in a most urgent call for us to rethink our relationships with the creations around us.

 

See a video here.

 

By guest reviewer Jason Nelson.

Source: artandsciencejournal

6art and science, exhibition technique, Exhibition Design, installation as exhibition, small,

Connecting with Audiences, Re-Interpreting the National Museum of the American Indian

In today’s Washington Post article “Devising new ways to nourish the mind and spirit" Peggy McGlone writes about the re-envisioning and re-interpretation of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian.  She explores the evolution of the interpretive strategies at this museum in its second decade.

Ms. McGlone quotes Kevin Gover, Director, National Museum of the American Indian:

"We must treat Native American history as American history, a very inclusive history,” he said. “So when someone comes into our galleries or reads our materials, they can find something about themselves."

She goes on to write:

But it must embrace all Americans without disappointing its native audience, and that might be a difficult task.

How appropriate that the #MAEXcorcoran Studio 1 and Thesis courses are, this week, tackling narrative choices and interpretive planning for exhibitions! (read more after the jump)

image

Pipes and pipe bags displayed in in the National Museum of the American Indian’s “Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations” exhibition. (Paul Morigi/AP Images for The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian)

Read More

6maexccorcoran, exhibition design, thesis, studio 1, narrative, interpretive strategies, NMAI, museum, smithsonian, Peggy McGlone, Washington Post, medium, longform,

Great session in #MAEXCORCORAN #thesis about interpretive strategies @corcoranGW

6maexcorcoran, thesis,

Congrats to my colleague Lisa Kathleen Graddy for her smart commentary on First Ladies’ fashion. @amhistorymuseum #timgunn #Smithsonian #exhibitiondesign

6timgunn, smithsonian, exhibitiondesign,

hyperallergic:

(via Guggenheim Plans Second New York Location)

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum will be adding a second location in New York, where it will “consolidate its staff and art storage into one efficient, multiuse building with a dynamic public programming component,” according to an online job listing.

READ MORE

Source: hyperallergic.com

6museum, guggenheim,

#Maker culture, #crowdsourced & #Exhibition #Design. Rockin’.

hyperallergic:

(via Making Sense of a Biennial of “Makers”)

NYC Makers: The MAD Biennial is the closest thing you’ll find to a crowd-sourced exhibition on view in New York right now — perhaps anywhere. Conceived during his first weeks on the job last fall by the Museum of Arts and Design’s (MAD) new director, Glenn Adamson, the show was organized at lightening speed, by museum standards: eight months.

READ MORE

Source: hyperallergic.com

6maker, crowdsourced, Exhibition Design,

#mobilemuseum
momalibrary:

Spotted at the New York Art Book Fair at MoMAPS1: the Mobile Museum of American Artifacts. -jt
ZoomInfo
Camera
iPhone 5c
ISO
50
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/374th
Focal Length
4mm

#mobilemuseum

momalibrary:

Spotted at the New York Art Book Fair at MoMAPS1: the Mobile Museum of American Artifacts. -jt

Source: momalibrary

6mobile museum,

The value of Artist Books. Please support the Corcoran Master of Arts in Art and the Book program in the transition to GWU!

hyperallergic:

(via Is Norway an Artist Book Paradise?)

Norway, the enigmatic teardrop of a nation that crowns the Scandinavian peninsula, could be considered heaven or hell depending on whom you ask. As recently as April of this year, Norway was targeted as a publishing paradise in The New Republic — a mecca for writers based on the 100% literacy rate and guaranteed income by way of grants and generous distribution to libraries and chain bookstores. But do artists publishing reap any benefits of the smarty-pants population?

READ MORE

Source: hyperallergic.com

6artist book, corcoran transition,

Hamster Wheel Standing Desk.

Perhaps not DIRECTLY related to Exhibition Design, but this falls in the category of #maker, #design, #engineeringforfun. Check out the whole article about this project HERE.

6maker, design, engineering, fun, trueinteractive, analog, medium,

mister-wunderkammer:

Counting in binary
Instead of counting up to five on each hand, a binary system can be used to count up to 31 on one hand, and up to 1023 on two hands. This is done by using your fingers to represent increasing numbers, multiplying by two each time.
Once the numbers 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 are assigned to the fingers, as above, different numbers can be represented by raising or tucking in the fingers. A raised finger represents its number being “on”, whereas a lowered finger represents its number being “off”.
For example, raising the thumb (1), the index finger (2) and the ring finger (8) shows a total of 1 + 2 + 8 = 11.
For higher numbers, exactly the same principle is used, by continuing to double the numbers used on the first hand: 32, 64, 128, 256, 512.
Alternatively, by placing your hand above a surface like a table, pressing the fingertip to the surface can be counted as “on”, which is useful both for the less dexterous and for avoiding having the number 4 misinterpreted by somebody else.

This is just fun.
ZoomInfo
mister-wunderkammer:

Counting in binary
Instead of counting up to five on each hand, a binary system can be used to count up to 31 on one hand, and up to 1023 on two hands. This is done by using your fingers to represent increasing numbers, multiplying by two each time.
Once the numbers 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 are assigned to the fingers, as above, different numbers can be represented by raising or tucking in the fingers. A raised finger represents its number being “on”, whereas a lowered finger represents its number being “off”.
For example, raising the thumb (1), the index finger (2) and the ring finger (8) shows a total of 1 + 2 + 8 = 11.
For higher numbers, exactly the same principle is used, by continuing to double the numbers used on the first hand: 32, 64, 128, 256, 512.
Alternatively, by placing your hand above a surface like a table, pressing the fingertip to the surface can be counted as “on”, which is useful both for the less dexterous and for avoiding having the number 4 misinterpreted by somebody else.

This is just fun.
ZoomInfo

mister-wunderkammer:

Counting in binary

Instead of counting up to five on each hand, a binary system can be used to count up to 31 on one hand, and up to 1023 on two hands. This is done by using your fingers to represent increasing numbers, multiplying by two each time.

Once the numbers 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 are assigned to the fingers, as above, different numbers can be represented by raising or tucking in the fingers. A raised finger represents its number being “on”, whereas a lowered finger represents its number being “off”.

For example, raising the thumb (1), the index finger (2) and the ring finger (8) shows a total of 1 + 2 + 8 = 11.

For higher numbers, exactly the same principle is used, by continuing to double the numbers used on the first hand: 32, 64, 128, 256, 512.

Alternatively, by placing your hand above a surface like a table, pressing the fingertip to the surface can be counted as “on”, which is useful both for the less dexterous and for avoiding having the number 4 misinterpreted by somebody else.

This is just fun.

(via visualizingmath)

Source: mister-wunderkammer

6and in other news, just for fun, small,

jrartist:

Cover of the New York Times Art Section announcing the Ellis Island Unframed project opening to the public ! More infos http://saveellisisland.org #ellisisland #UnframedProject thanks @ebanola :)

Have you been following the progress on JR’S latest installation? I have! I am continually impressed and inspired by how JR and his team push the boundaries of what is otherwise a simple medium: black and white photography and paste ups. His recent project with the NY Ballet blew my mind, but this Ellis Island project really takes the cake. His use of portraiture overlaid on to the historic Ellis Island building is one of the best recent examples of wordless interpretation in a history museum context. Talk about a narrative environment! Check out his Tumblr and instagram feed for more images. jrartist

Source: jrartist

6jr, Narrative Environments, wordless interpretation, intentional design, ellis island, Exhibition Design,

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