MA/EX Corcoran Orientation Day 1: Great work today from our incoming #MAEXcorcoran students! 

Today we explored thinking and modeling in 3D,  followed by a tour of the design offices of the National Gallery of Art! Thank you to Mark Leithauser and Donna Kirk for the inspirational tour and presentation about Exhibition Design at the National Gallery of Art. 

We ended our day with a design tour of two of my own exhibitions at the National Museum of American History: The First Ladies, and Food: Transforming the American Table, 1950-2000. 

More fun coming for Day 2 of orientation tomorrow!
ZoomInfo
MA/EX Corcoran Orientation Day 1: Great work today from our incoming #MAEXcorcoran students! 

Today we explored thinking and modeling in 3D,  followed by a tour of the design offices of the National Gallery of Art! Thank you to Mark Leithauser and Donna Kirk for the inspirational tour and presentation about Exhibition Design at the National Gallery of Art. 

We ended our day with a design tour of two of my own exhibitions at the National Museum of American History: The First Ladies, and Food: Transforming the American Table, 1950-2000. 

More fun coming for Day 2 of orientation tomorrow!
ZoomInfo
MA/EX Corcoran Orientation Day 1: Great work today from our incoming #MAEXcorcoran students! 

Today we explored thinking and modeling in 3D,  followed by a tour of the design offices of the National Gallery of Art! Thank you to Mark Leithauser and Donna Kirk for the inspirational tour and presentation about Exhibition Design at the National Gallery of Art. 

We ended our day with a design tour of two of my own exhibitions at the National Museum of American History: The First Ladies, and Food: Transforming the American Table, 1950-2000. 

More fun coming for Day 2 of orientation tomorrow!
ZoomInfo
MA/EX Corcoran Orientation Day 1: Great work today from our incoming #MAEXcorcoran students! 

Today we explored thinking and modeling in 3D,  followed by a tour of the design offices of the National Gallery of Art! Thank you to Mark Leithauser and Donna Kirk for the inspirational tour and presentation about Exhibition Design at the National Gallery of Art. 

We ended our day with a design tour of two of my own exhibitions at the National Museum of American History: The First Ladies, and Food: Transforming the American Table, 1950-2000. 

More fun coming for Day 2 of orientation tomorrow!
ZoomInfo
MA/EX Corcoran Orientation Day 1: Great work today from our incoming #MAEXcorcoran students! 

Today we explored thinking and modeling in 3D,  followed by a tour of the design offices of the National Gallery of Art! Thank you to Mark Leithauser and Donna Kirk for the inspirational tour and presentation about Exhibition Design at the National Gallery of Art. 

We ended our day with a design tour of two of my own exhibitions at the National Museum of American History: The First Ladies, and Food: Transforming the American Table, 1950-2000. 

More fun coming for Day 2 of orientation tomorrow!
ZoomInfo
MA/EX Corcoran Orientation Day 1: Great work today from our incoming #MAEXcorcoran students! 

Today we explored thinking and modeling in 3D,  followed by a tour of the design offices of the National Gallery of Art! Thank you to Mark Leithauser and Donna Kirk for the inspirational tour and presentation about Exhibition Design at the National Gallery of Art. 

We ended our day with a design tour of two of my own exhibitions at the National Museum of American History: The First Ladies, and Food: Transforming the American Table, 1950-2000. 

More fun coming for Day 2 of orientation tomorrow!
ZoomInfo
MA/EX Corcoran Orientation Day 1: Great work today from our incoming #MAEXcorcoran students! 

Today we explored thinking and modeling in 3D,  followed by a tour of the design offices of the National Gallery of Art! Thank you to Mark Leithauser and Donna Kirk for the inspirational tour and presentation about Exhibition Design at the National Gallery of Art. 

We ended our day with a design tour of two of my own exhibitions at the National Museum of American History: The First Ladies, and Food: Transforming the American Table, 1950-2000. 

More fun coming for Day 2 of orientation tomorrow!
ZoomInfo
MA/EX Corcoran Orientation Day 1: Great work today from our incoming #MAEXcorcoran students! 

Today we explored thinking and modeling in 3D,  followed by a tour of the design offices of the National Gallery of Art! Thank you to Mark Leithauser and Donna Kirk for the inspirational tour and presentation about Exhibition Design at the National Gallery of Art. 

We ended our day with a design tour of two of my own exhibitions at the National Museum of American History: The First Ladies, and Food: Transforming the American Table, 1950-2000. 

More fun coming for Day 2 of orientation tomorrow!
ZoomInfo

MA/EX Corcoran Orientation Day 1: Great work today from our incoming #MAEXcorcoran students!

Today we explored thinking and modeling in 3D, followed by a tour of the design offices of the National Gallery of Art! Thank you to Mark Leithauser and Donna Kirk for the inspirational tour and presentation about Exhibition Design at the National Gallery of Art.

We ended our day with a design tour of two of my own exhibitions at the National Museum of American History: The First Ladies, and Food: Transforming the American Table, 1950-2000.

More fun coming for Day 2 of orientation tomorrow!

6maexcorcoran, orientation, thinkingin3d,

SOMETIMES MUSEUMS JUST STINK. #stinkymuseum #huntington
huntingtonlibrary:

We had our first stinky plant bloom back in 1999. It was beautiful, it was smelly, it was visited by throngs of fans, it was documented with a timelapse, and it was a media darling. IT EVEN STARRED IN ITS OWN VHS.
Gearing up for another big bloom.  Stay tuned.  Keep checking in here, on twitter, on instagram, and on our website.
ZoomInfo
SOMETIMES MUSEUMS JUST STINK. #stinkymuseum #huntington
huntingtonlibrary:

We had our first stinky plant bloom back in 1999. It was beautiful, it was smelly, it was visited by throngs of fans, it was documented with a timelapse, and it was a media darling. IT EVEN STARRED IN ITS OWN VHS.
Gearing up for another big bloom.  Stay tuned.  Keep checking in here, on twitter, on instagram, and on our website.
ZoomInfo
SOMETIMES MUSEUMS JUST STINK. #stinkymuseum #huntington
huntingtonlibrary:

We had our first stinky plant bloom back in 1999. It was beautiful, it was smelly, it was visited by throngs of fans, it was documented with a timelapse, and it was a media darling. IT EVEN STARRED IN ITS OWN VHS.
Gearing up for another big bloom.  Stay tuned.  Keep checking in here, on twitter, on instagram, and on our website.
ZoomInfo
SOMETIMES MUSEUMS JUST STINK. #stinkymuseum #huntington
huntingtonlibrary:

We had our first stinky plant bloom back in 1999. It was beautiful, it was smelly, it was visited by throngs of fans, it was documented with a timelapse, and it was a media darling. IT EVEN STARRED IN ITS OWN VHS.
Gearing up for another big bloom.  Stay tuned.  Keep checking in here, on twitter, on instagram, and on our website.
ZoomInfo
SOMETIMES MUSEUMS JUST STINK. #stinkymuseum #huntington
huntingtonlibrary:

We had our first stinky plant bloom back in 1999. It was beautiful, it was smelly, it was visited by throngs of fans, it was documented with a timelapse, and it was a media darling. IT EVEN STARRED IN ITS OWN VHS.
Gearing up for another big bloom.  Stay tuned.  Keep checking in here, on twitter, on instagram, and on our website.
ZoomInfo
SOMETIMES MUSEUMS JUST STINK. #stinkymuseum #huntington
huntingtonlibrary:

We had our first stinky plant bloom back in 1999. It was beautiful, it was smelly, it was visited by throngs of fans, it was documented with a timelapse, and it was a media darling. IT EVEN STARRED IN ITS OWN VHS.
Gearing up for another big bloom.  Stay tuned.  Keep checking in here, on twitter, on instagram, and on our website.
ZoomInfo
SOMETIMES MUSEUMS JUST STINK. #stinkymuseum #huntington
huntingtonlibrary:

We had our first stinky plant bloom back in 1999. It was beautiful, it was smelly, it was visited by throngs of fans, it was documented with a timelapse, and it was a media darling. IT EVEN STARRED IN ITS OWN VHS.
Gearing up for another big bloom.  Stay tuned.  Keep checking in here, on twitter, on instagram, and on our website.
ZoomInfo
SOMETIMES MUSEUMS JUST STINK. #stinkymuseum #huntington
huntingtonlibrary:

We had our first stinky plant bloom back in 1999. It was beautiful, it was smelly, it was visited by throngs of fans, it was documented with a timelapse, and it was a media darling. IT EVEN STARRED IN ITS OWN VHS.
Gearing up for another big bloom.  Stay tuned.  Keep checking in here, on twitter, on instagram, and on our website.
ZoomInfo
SOMETIMES MUSEUMS JUST STINK. #stinkymuseum #huntington
huntingtonlibrary:

We had our first stinky plant bloom back in 1999. It was beautiful, it was smelly, it was visited by throngs of fans, it was documented with a timelapse, and it was a media darling. IT EVEN STARRED IN ITS OWN VHS.
Gearing up for another big bloom.  Stay tuned.  Keep checking in here, on twitter, on instagram, and on our website.
ZoomInfo

SOMETIMES MUSEUMS JUST STINK. #stinkymuseum #huntington

huntingtonlibrary:

We had our first stinky plant bloom back in 1999. It was beautiful, it was smelly, it was visited by throngs of fans, it was documented with a timelapse, and it was a media darling. IT EVEN STARRED IN ITS OWN VHS.

Gearing up for another big bloom.  Stay tuned.  Keep checking in here, on twitter, on instagram, and on our website.

Source: huntingtonlibrary

6trueinteractive, small,

dezeen:

The US Postal Service has had a face-lift by Grand Army »

#graphicdelight Check out this marvelous work by Grand Army for the US Postal Service on the “largest retail rebrand in American History.”

Source: dezeen.com

6graphic design, graphic delight,

dezeen:

Neon lurid colours illuminate this Nike pop-up shop »

Event marketing. Such fun.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
ISO
200
Aperture
f/16
Exposure
2"
Focal Length
25mm
instagram:


Reality Bites With @wkass
To see more photos of William’s miniature worlds, follow @wkass on Instagram.
“Using everyday foods in my creations is my way to call attention to the waste in the world and society’s consumer culture,” says São Paulo architect-turned-photographer William Kass (@wkass). William uses raw food and toy figures from his old architecture models to create edible worlds. “What really excites me is photography’s ability to transform everyday foods into something so enormous and surreal,” he says. “I ask myself: ‘If fruits and vegetables were giant, would we put an end to world hunger? If human beings were the size of ants, would there be enough room for everyone on the planet?’ I believe the answer would still be no.”


Just plain fun. And Visual Storytelling.
ZoomInfo
instagram:


Reality Bites With @wkass
To see more photos of William’s miniature worlds, follow @wkass on Instagram.
“Using everyday foods in my creations is my way to call attention to the waste in the world and society’s consumer culture,” says São Paulo architect-turned-photographer William Kass (@wkass). William uses raw food and toy figures from his old architecture models to create edible worlds. “What really excites me is photography’s ability to transform everyday foods into something so enormous and surreal,” he says. “I ask myself: ‘If fruits and vegetables were giant, would we put an end to world hunger? If human beings were the size of ants, would there be enough room for everyone on the planet?’ I believe the answer would still be no.”


Just plain fun. And Visual Storytelling.
ZoomInfo
instagram:


Reality Bites With @wkass
To see more photos of William’s miniature worlds, follow @wkass on Instagram.
“Using everyday foods in my creations is my way to call attention to the waste in the world and society’s consumer culture,” says São Paulo architect-turned-photographer William Kass (@wkass). William uses raw food and toy figures from his old architecture models to create edible worlds. “What really excites me is photography’s ability to transform everyday foods into something so enormous and surreal,” he says. “I ask myself: ‘If fruits and vegetables were giant, would we put an end to world hunger? If human beings were the size of ants, would there be enough room for everyone on the planet?’ I believe the answer would still be no.”


Just plain fun. And Visual Storytelling.
ZoomInfo
instagram:


Reality Bites With @wkass
To see more photos of William’s miniature worlds, follow @wkass on Instagram.
“Using everyday foods in my creations is my way to call attention to the waste in the world and society’s consumer culture,” says São Paulo architect-turned-photographer William Kass (@wkass). William uses raw food and toy figures from his old architecture models to create edible worlds. “What really excites me is photography’s ability to transform everyday foods into something so enormous and surreal,” he says. “I ask myself: ‘If fruits and vegetables were giant, would we put an end to world hunger? If human beings were the size of ants, would there be enough room for everyone on the planet?’ I believe the answer would still be no.”


Just plain fun. And Visual Storytelling.
ZoomInfo
instagram:


Reality Bites With @wkass
To see more photos of William’s miniature worlds, follow @wkass on Instagram.
“Using everyday foods in my creations is my way to call attention to the waste in the world and society’s consumer culture,” says São Paulo architect-turned-photographer William Kass (@wkass). William uses raw food and toy figures from his old architecture models to create edible worlds. “What really excites me is photography’s ability to transform everyday foods into something so enormous and surreal,” he says. “I ask myself: ‘If fruits and vegetables were giant, would we put an end to world hunger? If human beings were the size of ants, would there be enough room for everyone on the planet?’ I believe the answer would still be no.”


Just plain fun. And Visual Storytelling.
ZoomInfo

instagram:

Reality Bites With @wkass

To see more photos of William’s miniature worlds, follow @wkass on Instagram.

“Using everyday foods in my creations is my way to call attention to the waste in the world and society’s consumer culture,” says São Paulo architect-turned-photographer William Kass (@wkass). William uses raw food and toy figures from his old architecture models to create edible worlds. “What really excites me is photography’s ability to transform everyday foods into something so enormous and surreal,” he says. “I ask myself: ‘If fruits and vegetables were giant, would we put an end to world hunger? If human beings were the size of ants, would there be enough room for everyone on the planet?’ I believe the answer would still be no.”

Just plain fun. And Visual Storytelling.

Source: instagram

6visual storytelling, fun,

artandsciencejournal:

SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
ZoomInfo
artandsciencejournal:

SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
ZoomInfo
artandsciencejournal:

SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
ZoomInfo
artandsciencejournal:

SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
ZoomInfo

artandsciencejournal:

SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design

Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.

It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.

Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.

Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.

For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.

-Anna Paluch

Source: artandsciencejournal.com

6visual communication, trueinteractive,

Weeksville Heritage Center: “MULTIDIMENSIONAL MUSEUM”
From creativetime:


"Funk is the unending cycle of life. It’s the ultimate concept—wherever your imagination will take it." —Xenobia Bailey

One of four featured artists in #FunkGodJazzMedicine, New York City-based Xenobia Bailey is best known for her eclectic crocheted hats, large-scale mandalas, and tents consisting of colorful concentric circles and repeating patterns. Her designs draw influences from Africa, China, and Native American and Eastern philosophies, with undertones of the domestic aesthetic of her mother and other African American rural and urban homemakers, and of the 1960s and funk visual aesthetic.
Learn more about Xenobia and the other featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.

Ok, so I am reposting this from creativetime not only because I am completely enamored by Xenobia Bailey’s work, but also because I am so excited to learn about this project and about the Weeksville Heritage Center. Definitely check out their website, but in the meantime here is the passage from their “about” page that really intrigues me:

Weeksville Heritage Center (WHC) is a multidimensional museum dedicated to preserving the history of the 19th century African American community of Weeksville, Brooklyn – one of America’s first free black communities. 

Hold up: “multidimensional museum” I love that term. What a great reference for the Omnimuseum Project!

Weeksville, part of the present-day neighborhoods of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant, was an independent free black community, named for James Weeks. Weeks purchased property in 1838 in order to create an intentional landowning community just eleven years after slavery was abolished in New York State. Continuing the legacy of self-determination, Weeksville’s history was rediscovered in 1968 when urbanization threatened to erase the physical memory by destroying the few remaining historic homes. Instead, a grassroots preservation effort was led by artist and activist, Joan Maynard to preserve the Hunterfly Road Houses and the memory of historic Weeksville. Today WHC uses a contemporary lens to activate this unique history through the presentation of innovative, vanguard and experimental programs. Weeksville advances its mission through history, preservation, visual and performing arts, ecology and the built environment.

Yes, yes, yes! 
It is a marvelous thing when museums are defined beyond the confines of a four-walled building. 
ZoomInfo
Weeksville Heritage Center: “MULTIDIMENSIONAL MUSEUM”
From creativetime:


"Funk is the unending cycle of life. It’s the ultimate concept—wherever your imagination will take it." —Xenobia Bailey

One of four featured artists in #FunkGodJazzMedicine, New York City-based Xenobia Bailey is best known for her eclectic crocheted hats, large-scale mandalas, and tents consisting of colorful concentric circles and repeating patterns. Her designs draw influences from Africa, China, and Native American and Eastern philosophies, with undertones of the domestic aesthetic of her mother and other African American rural and urban homemakers, and of the 1960s and funk visual aesthetic.
Learn more about Xenobia and the other featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.

Ok, so I am reposting this from creativetime not only because I am completely enamored by Xenobia Bailey’s work, but also because I am so excited to learn about this project and about the Weeksville Heritage Center. Definitely check out their website, but in the meantime here is the passage from their “about” page that really intrigues me:

Weeksville Heritage Center (WHC) is a multidimensional museum dedicated to preserving the history of the 19th century African American community of Weeksville, Brooklyn – one of America’s first free black communities. 

Hold up: “multidimensional museum” I love that term. What a great reference for the Omnimuseum Project!

Weeksville, part of the present-day neighborhoods of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant, was an independent free black community, named for James Weeks. Weeks purchased property in 1838 in order to create an intentional landowning community just eleven years after slavery was abolished in New York State. Continuing the legacy of self-determination, Weeksville’s history was rediscovered in 1968 when urbanization threatened to erase the physical memory by destroying the few remaining historic homes. Instead, a grassroots preservation effort was led by artist and activist, Joan Maynard to preserve the Hunterfly Road Houses and the memory of historic Weeksville. Today WHC uses a contemporary lens to activate this unique history through the presentation of innovative, vanguard and experimental programs. Weeksville advances its mission through history, preservation, visual and performing arts, ecology and the built environment.

Yes, yes, yes! 
It is a marvelous thing when museums are defined beyond the confines of a four-walled building. 
ZoomInfo
Weeksville Heritage Center: “MULTIDIMENSIONAL MUSEUM”
From creativetime:


"Funk is the unending cycle of life. It’s the ultimate concept—wherever your imagination will take it." —Xenobia Bailey

One of four featured artists in #FunkGodJazzMedicine, New York City-based Xenobia Bailey is best known for her eclectic crocheted hats, large-scale mandalas, and tents consisting of colorful concentric circles and repeating patterns. Her designs draw influences from Africa, China, and Native American and Eastern philosophies, with undertones of the domestic aesthetic of her mother and other African American rural and urban homemakers, and of the 1960s and funk visual aesthetic.
Learn more about Xenobia and the other featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.

Ok, so I am reposting this from creativetime not only because I am completely enamored by Xenobia Bailey’s work, but also because I am so excited to learn about this project and about the Weeksville Heritage Center. Definitely check out their website, but in the meantime here is the passage from their “about” page that really intrigues me:

Weeksville Heritage Center (WHC) is a multidimensional museum dedicated to preserving the history of the 19th century African American community of Weeksville, Brooklyn – one of America’s first free black communities. 

Hold up: “multidimensional museum” I love that term. What a great reference for the Omnimuseum Project!

Weeksville, part of the present-day neighborhoods of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant, was an independent free black community, named for James Weeks. Weeks purchased property in 1838 in order to create an intentional landowning community just eleven years after slavery was abolished in New York State. Continuing the legacy of self-determination, Weeksville’s history was rediscovered in 1968 when urbanization threatened to erase the physical memory by destroying the few remaining historic homes. Instead, a grassroots preservation effort was led by artist and activist, Joan Maynard to preserve the Hunterfly Road Houses and the memory of historic Weeksville. Today WHC uses a contemporary lens to activate this unique history through the presentation of innovative, vanguard and experimental programs. Weeksville advances its mission through history, preservation, visual and performing arts, ecology and the built environment.

Yes, yes, yes! 
It is a marvelous thing when museums are defined beyond the confines of a four-walled building. 
ZoomInfo
Weeksville Heritage Center: “MULTIDIMENSIONAL MUSEUM”
From creativetime:


"Funk is the unending cycle of life. It’s the ultimate concept—wherever your imagination will take it." —Xenobia Bailey

One of four featured artists in #FunkGodJazzMedicine, New York City-based Xenobia Bailey is best known for her eclectic crocheted hats, large-scale mandalas, and tents consisting of colorful concentric circles and repeating patterns. Her designs draw influences from Africa, China, and Native American and Eastern philosophies, with undertones of the domestic aesthetic of her mother and other African American rural and urban homemakers, and of the 1960s and funk visual aesthetic.
Learn more about Xenobia and the other featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.

Ok, so I am reposting this from creativetime not only because I am completely enamored by Xenobia Bailey’s work, but also because I am so excited to learn about this project and about the Weeksville Heritage Center. Definitely check out their website, but in the meantime here is the passage from their “about” page that really intrigues me:

Weeksville Heritage Center (WHC) is a multidimensional museum dedicated to preserving the history of the 19th century African American community of Weeksville, Brooklyn – one of America’s first free black communities. 

Hold up: “multidimensional museum” I love that term. What a great reference for the Omnimuseum Project!

Weeksville, part of the present-day neighborhoods of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant, was an independent free black community, named for James Weeks. Weeks purchased property in 1838 in order to create an intentional landowning community just eleven years after slavery was abolished in New York State. Continuing the legacy of self-determination, Weeksville’s history was rediscovered in 1968 when urbanization threatened to erase the physical memory by destroying the few remaining historic homes. Instead, a grassroots preservation effort was led by artist and activist, Joan Maynard to preserve the Hunterfly Road Houses and the memory of historic Weeksville. Today WHC uses a contemporary lens to activate this unique history through the presentation of innovative, vanguard and experimental programs. Weeksville advances its mission through history, preservation, visual and performing arts, ecology and the built environment.

Yes, yes, yes! 
It is a marvelous thing when museums are defined beyond the confines of a four-walled building. 
ZoomInfo
Weeksville Heritage Center: “MULTIDIMENSIONAL MUSEUM”
From creativetime:


"Funk is the unending cycle of life. It’s the ultimate concept—wherever your imagination will take it." —Xenobia Bailey

One of four featured artists in #FunkGodJazzMedicine, New York City-based Xenobia Bailey is best known for her eclectic crocheted hats, large-scale mandalas, and tents consisting of colorful concentric circles and repeating patterns. Her designs draw influences from Africa, China, and Native American and Eastern philosophies, with undertones of the domestic aesthetic of her mother and other African American rural and urban homemakers, and of the 1960s and funk visual aesthetic.
Learn more about Xenobia and the other featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.

Ok, so I am reposting this from creativetime not only because I am completely enamored by Xenobia Bailey’s work, but also because I am so excited to learn about this project and about the Weeksville Heritage Center. Definitely check out their website, but in the meantime here is the passage from their “about” page that really intrigues me:

Weeksville Heritage Center (WHC) is a multidimensional museum dedicated to preserving the history of the 19th century African American community of Weeksville, Brooklyn – one of America’s first free black communities. 

Hold up: “multidimensional museum” I love that term. What a great reference for the Omnimuseum Project!

Weeksville, part of the present-day neighborhoods of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant, was an independent free black community, named for James Weeks. Weeks purchased property in 1838 in order to create an intentional landowning community just eleven years after slavery was abolished in New York State. Continuing the legacy of self-determination, Weeksville’s history was rediscovered in 1968 when urbanization threatened to erase the physical memory by destroying the few remaining historic homes. Instead, a grassroots preservation effort was led by artist and activist, Joan Maynard to preserve the Hunterfly Road Houses and the memory of historic Weeksville. Today WHC uses a contemporary lens to activate this unique history through the presentation of innovative, vanguard and experimental programs. Weeksville advances its mission through history, preservation, visual and performing arts, ecology and the built environment.

Yes, yes, yes! 
It is a marvelous thing when museums are defined beyond the confines of a four-walled building. 
ZoomInfo
Weeksville Heritage Center: “MULTIDIMENSIONAL MUSEUM”
From creativetime:


"Funk is the unending cycle of life. It’s the ultimate concept—wherever your imagination will take it." —Xenobia Bailey

One of four featured artists in #FunkGodJazzMedicine, New York City-based Xenobia Bailey is best known for her eclectic crocheted hats, large-scale mandalas, and tents consisting of colorful concentric circles and repeating patterns. Her designs draw influences from Africa, China, and Native American and Eastern philosophies, with undertones of the domestic aesthetic of her mother and other African American rural and urban homemakers, and of the 1960s and funk visual aesthetic.
Learn more about Xenobia and the other featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.

Ok, so I am reposting this from creativetime not only because I am completely enamored by Xenobia Bailey’s work, but also because I am so excited to learn about this project and about the Weeksville Heritage Center. Definitely check out their website, but in the meantime here is the passage from their “about” page that really intrigues me:

Weeksville Heritage Center (WHC) is a multidimensional museum dedicated to preserving the history of the 19th century African American community of Weeksville, Brooklyn – one of America’s first free black communities. 

Hold up: “multidimensional museum” I love that term. What a great reference for the Omnimuseum Project!

Weeksville, part of the present-day neighborhoods of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant, was an independent free black community, named for James Weeks. Weeks purchased property in 1838 in order to create an intentional landowning community just eleven years after slavery was abolished in New York State. Continuing the legacy of self-determination, Weeksville’s history was rediscovered in 1968 when urbanization threatened to erase the physical memory by destroying the few remaining historic homes. Instead, a grassroots preservation effort was led by artist and activist, Joan Maynard to preserve the Hunterfly Road Houses and the memory of historic Weeksville. Today WHC uses a contemporary lens to activate this unique history through the presentation of innovative, vanguard and experimental programs. Weeksville advances its mission through history, preservation, visual and performing arts, ecology and the built environment.

Yes, yes, yes! 
It is a marvelous thing when museums are defined beyond the confines of a four-walled building. 
ZoomInfo

Weeksville Heritage Center: “MULTIDIMENSIONAL MUSEUM”

From creativetime:

"Funk is the unending cycle of life. It’s the ultimate concept—wherever your imagination will take it." —Xenobia Bailey

One of four featured artists in #FunkGodJazzMedicine, New York City-based Xenobia Bailey is best known for her eclectic crocheted hats, large-scale mandalas, and tents consisting of colorful concentric circles and repeating patterns. Her designs draw influences from Africa, China, and Native American and Eastern philosophies, with undertones of the domestic aesthetic of her mother and other African American rural and urban homemakers, and of the 1960s and funk visual aesthetic.

Learn more about Xenobia and the other featured artists in Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.

Ok, so I am reposting this from creativetime not only because I am completely enamored by Xenobia Bailey’s work, but also because I am so excited to learn about this project and about the Weeksville Heritage Center. Definitely check out their website, but in the meantime here is the passage from their “about” page that really intrigues me:

Weeksville Heritage Center (WHC) is a multidimensional museum dedicated to preserving the history of the 19th century African American community of Weeksville, Brooklyn – one of America’s first free black communities. 

Hold up: “multidimensional museum” I love that term. What a great reference for the Omnimuseum Project!

Weeksville, part of the present-day neighborhoods of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant, was an independent free black community, named for James Weeks. Weeks purchased property in 1838 in order to create an intentional landowning community just eleven years after slavery was abolished in New York State. Continuing the legacy of self-determination, Weeksville’s history was rediscovered in 1968 when urbanization threatened to erase the physical memory by destroying the few remaining historic homes. Instead, a grassroots preservation effort was led by artist and activist, Joan Maynard to preserve the Hunterfly Road Houses and the memory of historic Weeksville. Today WHC uses a contemporary lens to activate this unique history through the presentation of innovative, vanguard and experimental programs. Weeksville advances its mission through history, preservation, visual and performing arts, ecology and the built environment.

Yes, yes, yes! 

It is a marvelous thing when museums are defined beyond the confines of a four-walled building. 

Source: creativetime

6medium, outsidethemuseumbox, hackthebox, omnimuseumproject, inspiration,

#Exhibitstosee #MCNY #PlacesILovedWorking 

Source: museumgifs

6medium,

dezeen:

Porcelain poppies surround the Tower of London to commemorate World War I »

Fascinating installation and apt use of visual storytelling.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 600D
ISO
100
Aperture
f/8
Exposure
1/160th
Focal Length
27mm

Sweet use of PVC tube, magnets, and golf balls in the “design a track” activity at the Boston Children’s Museum. #MAEXCORCORAN

6maexcorcoran,

artandsciencejournal:

The Invisible Presence
The works of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller often create a potent atmosphere through the abundant use of antiquated objects and nostalgic memorabilia. Kitty Scott of the AGO astutely thought to link the words memory palace to their works, which have been collected in a retrospective show held at the AGO and the Vancouver Art Gallery, where I was lucky enough to experience it. This description is most accurate because each piece is a complex network of memories that are at once accessible and completely foreign to the viewer. Works such as Dark Pool, 1995, Opera for a Small Room, 2005, and The Killing Machine, 2007, are composed of dense collections of used objects that have a strongly uncanny presence. The objects are often well worn and bear the musk of a former possessor. They are commonplace objects: vinyl records, tea cups, personal diaries and journals, all domestic items that most visitors have been intimately familiar with at one point in their life. And yet now the objects are being used and displayed so strangely in dark, heavy installations that any personal memories evoked in the viewer are undeniably contaminated by a foreign presence.
In Opera for a Small Room Cardiff & Miller use programmed lighting and robots to create the visual and aural traces of an unseeable person performing for the audience. The sound system plays a recording of the invisible man scuffling through the room, sorting through the stacks of records and speaking to the audience. His presence is further supported by lighting that creates his shadow flickering around the room and robotics that pull out his chair and turn on the record players. The invisible presence of modern technology is disguised as the invisible presence of the ghost who inhabits the installation. 
The Killing Machine has a menacing presence when visitors are first confronted with it. Two gangly and yet sinister robotic arms, as well as a variety of old television sets emitting buzzing static images surround an electronic dentist’s chair. The experience of the installation however only truly begins when the viewer inevitable pushes the large button that entices visitors to PRESS it. The Killing Machine is then brought to life and the viewer can only watch in horror as an invisible victim is tortured to death by the robotic arms equipped with firing pneumatic pistons that whirl in a dance of death around the chair. Click here to watch The Killing Machine in action.
Underlying the dated and decrepit objects of the Cardiff & Miller installations is a force used to create the eerie presence of their pieces. These artists ironically rely on the latest technology to bring new life and a new presence to their installations. Robotics and precise programming are essential to the execution of these pieces. Interestingly, in an interview with Canadian Art Cardiff explained that “Technology is not the subject matter for us,” and Miller was quick to follow, stating, “The concern is only in what it can do for us.”  Despite this aloof attitude towards technology, the duo is dependent upon the latest innovations to bring their ideas to fruition. Art and technology are inseparable from each other in the work of these two artists.
The Vancouver Art Gallery is set to host Lost in the Memory Palace from June 21st to September 21st, 2014.
- Emily Cluett

#exhibitstosee #wordless #MAEXcorcoran #metaphorasdesignThank you to Emily Cluett for the wonderful description of this exhibition.The concept of “memory palaces” has always fascinated me. It makes for a perfect metaphor around which to frame an exhibition design intention. (There was a great piece on NPR a few years ago about the history of memory palaces and about contemporary people who create complex memory palaces in their minds to learn hundreds of numbers in Pi, or to commit to memory complicated instructions or lists.)What draws me to this installation is how ambient and evocative it is. There is a clear but wordless story to each of the scenes. I would love to see more interpretive exhibitions using the techniques of wordless storytelling. Dioramas come to mind as a similar technique for conveying contextual narrative in exhibitions. Another example is immersive exhibitions that convey story through contextual setting. Why, though, am I turned off by those techniques, and completely fascinated by this installation? I do have a secret attraction to animal dioramas, but never the ones with people in them. The presence of fake people ruins the detective-like thrill of  imaginative observation. They take away my ability to place myself into the scene and imagine it for myself. Also, fake people always look dated, and just so… Fake. I love that this installation employs techniques that suggest the presence of someone occupying the scenes, without a literal representation of that person.  This reminds me of the marvelous project by Howard + Revis in which they used light and sound to “re-haunt” an historic farm building at the Sandy Spring Quaker Museum. Suggestive and evocative exhibition design can take the visitors imagination much further than overt interpretation. I suppose the challenge is to balance accurate interpretation with imagination, but good exhibition design should allow for both.
ZoomInfo
artandsciencejournal:

The Invisible Presence
The works of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller often create a potent atmosphere through the abundant use of antiquated objects and nostalgic memorabilia. Kitty Scott of the AGO astutely thought to link the words memory palace to their works, which have been collected in a retrospective show held at the AGO and the Vancouver Art Gallery, where I was lucky enough to experience it. This description is most accurate because each piece is a complex network of memories that are at once accessible and completely foreign to the viewer. Works such as Dark Pool, 1995, Opera for a Small Room, 2005, and The Killing Machine, 2007, are composed of dense collections of used objects that have a strongly uncanny presence. The objects are often well worn and bear the musk of a former possessor. They are commonplace objects: vinyl records, tea cups, personal diaries and journals, all domestic items that most visitors have been intimately familiar with at one point in their life. And yet now the objects are being used and displayed so strangely in dark, heavy installations that any personal memories evoked in the viewer are undeniably contaminated by a foreign presence.
In Opera for a Small Room Cardiff & Miller use programmed lighting and robots to create the visual and aural traces of an unseeable person performing for the audience. The sound system plays a recording of the invisible man scuffling through the room, sorting through the stacks of records and speaking to the audience. His presence is further supported by lighting that creates his shadow flickering around the room and robotics that pull out his chair and turn on the record players. The invisible presence of modern technology is disguised as the invisible presence of the ghost who inhabits the installation. 
The Killing Machine has a menacing presence when visitors are first confronted with it. Two gangly and yet sinister robotic arms, as well as a variety of old television sets emitting buzzing static images surround an electronic dentist’s chair. The experience of the installation however only truly begins when the viewer inevitable pushes the large button that entices visitors to PRESS it. The Killing Machine is then brought to life and the viewer can only watch in horror as an invisible victim is tortured to death by the robotic arms equipped with firing pneumatic pistons that whirl in a dance of death around the chair. Click here to watch The Killing Machine in action.
Underlying the dated and decrepit objects of the Cardiff & Miller installations is a force used to create the eerie presence of their pieces. These artists ironically rely on the latest technology to bring new life and a new presence to their installations. Robotics and precise programming are essential to the execution of these pieces. Interestingly, in an interview with Canadian Art Cardiff explained that “Technology is not the subject matter for us,” and Miller was quick to follow, stating, “The concern is only in what it can do for us.”  Despite this aloof attitude towards technology, the duo is dependent upon the latest innovations to bring their ideas to fruition. Art and technology are inseparable from each other in the work of these two artists.
The Vancouver Art Gallery is set to host Lost in the Memory Palace from June 21st to September 21st, 2014.
- Emily Cluett

#exhibitstosee #wordless #MAEXcorcoran #metaphorasdesignThank you to Emily Cluett for the wonderful description of this exhibition.The concept of “memory palaces” has always fascinated me. It makes for a perfect metaphor around which to frame an exhibition design intention. (There was a great piece on NPR a few years ago about the history of memory palaces and about contemporary people who create complex memory palaces in their minds to learn hundreds of numbers in Pi, or to commit to memory complicated instructions or lists.)What draws me to this installation is how ambient and evocative it is. There is a clear but wordless story to each of the scenes. I would love to see more interpretive exhibitions using the techniques of wordless storytelling. Dioramas come to mind as a similar technique for conveying contextual narrative in exhibitions. Another example is immersive exhibitions that convey story through contextual setting. Why, though, am I turned off by those techniques, and completely fascinated by this installation? I do have a secret attraction to animal dioramas, but never the ones with people in them. The presence of fake people ruins the detective-like thrill of  imaginative observation. They take away my ability to place myself into the scene and imagine it for myself. Also, fake people always look dated, and just so… Fake. I love that this installation employs techniques that suggest the presence of someone occupying the scenes, without a literal representation of that person.  This reminds me of the marvelous project by Howard + Revis in which they used light and sound to “re-haunt” an historic farm building at the Sandy Spring Quaker Museum. Suggestive and evocative exhibition design can take the visitors imagination much further than overt interpretation. I suppose the challenge is to balance accurate interpretation with imagination, but good exhibition design should allow for both.
ZoomInfo
artandsciencejournal:

The Invisible Presence
The works of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller often create a potent atmosphere through the abundant use of antiquated objects and nostalgic memorabilia. Kitty Scott of the AGO astutely thought to link the words memory palace to their works, which have been collected in a retrospective show held at the AGO and the Vancouver Art Gallery, where I was lucky enough to experience it. This description is most accurate because each piece is a complex network of memories that are at once accessible and completely foreign to the viewer. Works such as Dark Pool, 1995, Opera for a Small Room, 2005, and The Killing Machine, 2007, are composed of dense collections of used objects that have a strongly uncanny presence. The objects are often well worn and bear the musk of a former possessor. They are commonplace objects: vinyl records, tea cups, personal diaries and journals, all domestic items that most visitors have been intimately familiar with at one point in their life. And yet now the objects are being used and displayed so strangely in dark, heavy installations that any personal memories evoked in the viewer are undeniably contaminated by a foreign presence.
In Opera for a Small Room Cardiff & Miller use programmed lighting and robots to create the visual and aural traces of an unseeable person performing for the audience. The sound system plays a recording of the invisible man scuffling through the room, sorting through the stacks of records and speaking to the audience. His presence is further supported by lighting that creates his shadow flickering around the room and robotics that pull out his chair and turn on the record players. The invisible presence of modern technology is disguised as the invisible presence of the ghost who inhabits the installation. 
The Killing Machine has a menacing presence when visitors are first confronted with it. Two gangly and yet sinister robotic arms, as well as a variety of old television sets emitting buzzing static images surround an electronic dentist’s chair. The experience of the installation however only truly begins when the viewer inevitable pushes the large button that entices visitors to PRESS it. The Killing Machine is then brought to life and the viewer can only watch in horror as an invisible victim is tortured to death by the robotic arms equipped with firing pneumatic pistons that whirl in a dance of death around the chair. Click here to watch The Killing Machine in action.
Underlying the dated and decrepit objects of the Cardiff & Miller installations is a force used to create the eerie presence of their pieces. These artists ironically rely on the latest technology to bring new life and a new presence to their installations. Robotics and precise programming are essential to the execution of these pieces. Interestingly, in an interview with Canadian Art Cardiff explained that “Technology is not the subject matter for us,” and Miller was quick to follow, stating, “The concern is only in what it can do for us.”  Despite this aloof attitude towards technology, the duo is dependent upon the latest innovations to bring their ideas to fruition. Art and technology are inseparable from each other in the work of these two artists.
The Vancouver Art Gallery is set to host Lost in the Memory Palace from June 21st to September 21st, 2014.
- Emily Cluett

#exhibitstosee #wordless #MAEXcorcoran #metaphorasdesignThank you to Emily Cluett for the wonderful description of this exhibition.The concept of “memory palaces” has always fascinated me. It makes for a perfect metaphor around which to frame an exhibition design intention. (There was a great piece on NPR a few years ago about the history of memory palaces and about contemporary people who create complex memory palaces in their minds to learn hundreds of numbers in Pi, or to commit to memory complicated instructions or lists.)What draws me to this installation is how ambient and evocative it is. There is a clear but wordless story to each of the scenes. I would love to see more interpretive exhibitions using the techniques of wordless storytelling. Dioramas come to mind as a similar technique for conveying contextual narrative in exhibitions. Another example is immersive exhibitions that convey story through contextual setting. Why, though, am I turned off by those techniques, and completely fascinated by this installation? I do have a secret attraction to animal dioramas, but never the ones with people in them. The presence of fake people ruins the detective-like thrill of  imaginative observation. They take away my ability to place myself into the scene and imagine it for myself. Also, fake people always look dated, and just so… Fake. I love that this installation employs techniques that suggest the presence of someone occupying the scenes, without a literal representation of that person.  This reminds me of the marvelous project by Howard + Revis in which they used light and sound to “re-haunt” an historic farm building at the Sandy Spring Quaker Museum. Suggestive and evocative exhibition design can take the visitors imagination much further than overt interpretation. I suppose the challenge is to balance accurate interpretation with imagination, but good exhibition design should allow for both.
ZoomInfo

artandsciencejournal:

The Invisible Presence

The works of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller often create a potent atmosphere through the abundant use of antiquated objects and nostalgic memorabilia. Kitty Scott of the AGO astutely thought to link the words memory palace to their works, which have been collected in a retrospective show held at the AGO and the Vancouver Art Gallery, where I was lucky enough to experience it. This description is most accurate because each piece is a complex network of memories that are at once accessible and completely foreign to the viewer. Works such as Dark Pool, 1995, Opera for a Small Room, 2005, and The Killing Machine, 2007, are composed of dense collections of used objects that have a strongly uncanny presence. The objects are often well worn and bear the musk of a former possessor. They are commonplace objects: vinyl records, tea cups, personal diaries and journals, all domestic items that most visitors have been intimately familiar with at one point in their life. And yet now the objects are being used and displayed so strangely in dark, heavy installations that any personal memories evoked in the viewer are undeniably contaminated by a foreign presence.

In Opera for a Small Room Cardiff & Miller use programmed lighting and robots to create the visual and aural traces of an unseeable person performing for the audience. The sound system plays a recording of the invisible man scuffling through the room, sorting through the stacks of records and speaking to the audience. His presence is further supported by lighting that creates his shadow flickering around the room and robotics that pull out his chair and turn on the record players. The invisible presence of modern technology is disguised as the invisible presence of the ghost who inhabits the installation.

The Killing Machine has a menacing presence when visitors are first confronted with it. Two gangly and yet sinister robotic arms, as well as a variety of old television sets emitting buzzing static images surround an electronic dentist’s chair. The experience of the installation however only truly begins when the viewer inevitable pushes the large button that entices visitors to PRESS it. The Killing Machine is then brought to life and the viewer can only watch in horror as an invisible victim is tortured to death by the robotic arms equipped with firing pneumatic pistons that whirl in a dance of death around the chair. Click here to watch The Killing Machine in action.

Underlying the dated and decrepit objects of the Cardiff & Miller installations is a force used to create the eerie presence of their pieces. These artists ironically rely on the latest technology to bring new life and a new presence to their installations. Robotics and precise programming are essential to the execution of these pieces. Interestingly, in an interview with Canadian Art Cardiff explained that “Technology is not the subject matter for us,” and Miller was quick to follow, stating, “The concern is only in what it can do for us.”  Despite this aloof attitude towards technology, the duo is dependent upon the latest innovations to bring their ideas to fruition. Art and technology are inseparable from each other in the work of these two artists.

The Vancouver Art Gallery is set to host Lost in the Memory Palace from June 21st to September 21st, 2014.

- Emily Cluett

#exhibitstosee #wordless #MAEXcorcoran #metaphorasdesign

Thank you to Emily Cluett for the wonderful description of this exhibition.

The concept of “memory palaces” has always fascinated me. It makes for a perfect metaphor around which to frame an exhibition design intention.

(There was a great piece on NPR a few years ago about the history of memory palaces and about contemporary people who create complex memory palaces in their minds to learn hundreds of numbers in Pi, or to commit to memory complicated instructions or lists.)

What draws me to this installation is how ambient and evocative it is. There is a clear but wordless story to each of the scenes. I would love to see more interpretive exhibitions using the techniques of wordless storytelling.

Dioramas come to mind as a similar technique for conveying contextual narrative in exhibitions. Another example is immersive exhibitions that convey story through contextual setting. Why, though, am I turned off by those techniques, and completely fascinated by this installation?

I do have a secret attraction to animal dioramas, but never the ones with people in them. The presence of fake people ruins the detective-like thrill of imaginative observation. They take away my ability to place myself into the scene and imagine it for myself. Also, fake people always look dated, and just so… Fake.

I love that this installation employs techniques that suggest the presence of someone occupying the scenes, without a literal representation of that person.

This reminds me of the marvelous project by Howard + Revis in which they used light and sound to “re-haunt” an historic farm building at the Sandy Spring Quaker Museum. Suggestive and evocative exhibition design can take the visitors imagination much further than overt interpretation.

I suppose the challenge is to balance accurate interpretation with imagination, but good exhibition design should allow for both.

Source: artandsciencejournal

6installationasexhibition, exhibitstosee, metaphor,

Dragon tail feathers. Xu Bing at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine #summertrip14 #exhibitstosee

6summertrip14, exhibitstosee,

Chutes and Ladders at the New Museum f

Oh how much do I wish I had seen this installation by Carsten Holler at the New Museum in 2011-12! So much! Hell Yes (as the New Museum says). #trueinteractive #experience #installationasexhibition

massmoca:

itscontemporary:

Lee Boroson - Tang

Lee Boroson is coming to MASS MoCA in Octoober 2014! Just a few short months away. 

#exhibitstosee

Source: leeboroson.com

buildingmuseum:

#BIGMaze aura @bjarkeingels @bjarkeingelsgroup

Yay! I can’t wait to go! #superfunmuseum

Source: buildingmuseum

6superfunmuseum,

-